Meet the team

Theme Leads 

Professor John Brazier, Professor Mark Sculpher

Acting Theme Lead 
Dr Tracey Young

Theme Administrator
Amanda Lane


For more information about HEOM, or to discuss collaborating with the team, 


Professor Karen Bloor
karen.bloor@york.ac.uk

Karen is Professor of Health Economics and Policy, and has worked at the University of York for over 20 years. 
Her research interests focus particularly on the application of economics to health policy, and she has carried out research projects on a range of subjects relating to the financing and delivery of health care, including analysis of medical labour markets, medical practice variations, pharmaceutical markets and various aspects of health care reform. 

She is also involved in research around the area of child health, including deriving the health domain of a local index of child well-being, and working with the Maternal and Child Health theme of the NIHR CLAHRC for Leeds, York and Bradford from 2008 to 2013. In the CLAHRC for Yorkshire and Humber, she is part of the Health Economics and Outcome Measurement theme, working particularly with the Healthy Families, Healthy Children projects.


Dr Laura Bojke
laura.bojke@york.ac.uk

Laura has a BA in Business Economics, an MSc in health economics and a PhD in Economics from the University of York. Her PhD looked at structural uncertainty within decision analytic models and the use of expert elicitation. She joined the economic evaluation team at the Centre for Health Economics (CHE), University of York, in 1999. She is a senior research fellow.

Her research interests include:

  • The assessment and implications of structural uncertainty within decision analytic models
  • The use of elicited data within decision analytic models
  • The application of methods of evidence synthesis within a decision analytic framework
  • Extrapolating costs and benefits beyond the available evidence
  • Public health modelling

Laura has considerable experience in technology assessment, both trial-based and modelling projects. She has worked in a wide range of disease areas and has contributed towards assessments undertaken for the technology appraisals process at NICE.


Dr Chris Bojke
chris.bojke@york.ac.uk

Chris is a Senior Research Fellow based in the Health Policy team at CHE at the University of York. Prior to this Chris was a senior research consultant and director of Pharmerit Ltd, a private health economics consultancy firm providing NICE reference case standard economic evaluations primarily to the pharmaceutical industry.

Recent research interests include the implementation of modern econometric methods on large and complex datasets underpinned by economic theory but with an emphasis on aiding decision making. This has required not only a strong working knowledge of modern methods, particularly limited dependent variables, longitudinal/panel data methods and Bayesian methods but perhaps just as importantly, the software used to implement them (SAS, Stata, WinBUGS). Furthermore Chris is very experienced with handling large and complex datasets, clinical trial data as well as observational e.g. HES, THIN, GPRD, HODaR, PLASC, Labour Force Survey, etc.




Professor John Brazier
Theme Lead for HEOM
j.e.brazier@sheffield.ac.uk

John is Professor of Health Economics at the School for Health and Related Research (ScHARR), University of Sheffield. He is Director of the Policy Research Unit in Economic Evaluation of Health and Care Interventions (EEPRU) and has more than 20 years’ experience of conducting economic evaluations for policy makers. 

John's main research interests are the measurement and valuation of health for economic evaluation, including the development of preference-based measures of health. 





Francesco Paolo Candio
umfpc@leeds.ac.uk

Paolo is a PhD student at the Leeds Institute of Health Sciences. His academic background ranges from Economics (MSc) to Physical Activity and Sport Sciences (BSc). After having completed a MSc in Public Health at the University of Bristol in 2015, he started his PhD.

His research focuses on the economic evaluation of a physical activity promotion programme from a public sector perspective.





Ana Duarte
ana.duarte@york.ac.uk

Ana Duarte is a Research Fellow in the Team for Economic Evaluation and Health Technology Assessment (TEEHTA). She joined TEEHTA in November 2012 after studying the MSc in Health Economics at the University of York. Ana also holds a Pharmacy degree from the University of Lisbon, and has previously worked as a pharmacist in Portugal.






Dr Matt Franklin
matt.franklin@sheffield.ac.uk

Matt joined the School for Health and Related Research (ScHARR) in 2014 as a Health Economist Research Associate for Health Economics and Decision Science (HEDS).

Matt’s research interests include cost-effectiveness analysis and Markov modelling methodology; trial-based economic evaluation; pathway-based economic modelling; the capability approach to health outcomes measurement and valuation; use of electronic administrative databases for costing studies and economic modelling; use of self-reported resource use data for costing studies and economic modelling.





Sebastian Hinde
sebastian.hinde@york.ac.uk

Sebastian Hinde is a Research Fellow in the Team for Economic Evaluation and Health Technology Assessment (TEEHTA) in the Centre for Health Economics at the University of York.  He joined TEEHTA in 2010 after previously completing a BSc in Economics and an MSc in Health Economics both from the University of York.

He has conducted a range of trial and literature based economic evaluations, and is a member of the Policy Research Unit in Economic Evaluation of Health and Care Interventions (EEPRU) and the Yorkshire and the Humber Research Design Service (RDS). In addition to research activities he has an interest in the use of animated videos to introduce the core concepts of health economics to lay audiences (http://www.york.ac.uk/che/che-animation/).



Dina Jankovic

Dina is a PhD student at the Centre for Health Economics, University of York. Her research focuses on elicitation of experts’ opinion as a tool for quantifying uncertainty in economic evaluation and health technology assessment.

Dina holds a Pharmacy degree from the University of Manchester and an MSc in Heath Economics from the University of York. Her MSc research project involved economic evaluation in public health at the World Health Organization.



Dr James Lomas

James joined the Team for Economic Evaluation and Health Technology Assessment (TEEHTA) at the University of York in October 2014. Prior to this he was a PhD student affiliated with the Health, Econometrics and Data Group, supervised by Andrew Jones and Nigel Rice. His thesis was concerned with the assessment of methods for modelling the distribution of healthcare costs.

He holds a BA in Economics from the University of Cambridge and an MSc in Health Economics from the University of York, and has worked at the OECD and the Department of Health (UK) on summer placements. His PhD was funded by the ESRC and he was a Royal Economics Society Junior Fellow in 2013-2014.





Richard Mattock

Richard Mattock is a PhD student in the Department of Health Sciences, University of York. The focus of his research is on the application of methods of economic evaluation in the area of child health.

Prior to undertaking his PhD, Richard completed a BSc Neuroscience degree at the University of Leeds and obtained an MSc in Health Economics from the University of York, the research element of which explored Health Technology Assessment in mental health.





Dr Clara Mukuria

Clara is a member of the Policy Research Unit in Economic Evaluation of Health and Care Interventions (EEPRU). 

Her research interests include assessing the use of well-being as an outcome measure for economic evaluation; development and testing of preference-based health measures in different populations; mapping between condition-specific and generic preference-based measures of health. 








Hannah Penton
hpenton1@sheffield.ac.uk

Hannah began her studies at the University of Sheffield in 2011, and graduated with a BSc in Economics in 2014 and completed an Msc in Health Economics and Decision Modelling (HEDM) in ScHARR in October 2015. She began her PhD 'Exploring the economics of unified budgets for health and social care.' in November 2015 funded by the University of Sheffield CLAHRC White Rose Network Scholarship.

Hannah's general research interests are methodological issues in cross-sectoral economic evaluation, especially issues surrounding outcome measurement.






Francesco Ramponi
fr644@york.ac.uk

Francesco is a PhD student at the Centre for Health Economics, University of York. The focus of his research is on evaluating cost-effectiveness of interventions in marginalised groups, where cross-sectoral and cross-temporal concerns assume particular relevance. 

Francesco holds a BSc in Economics from the University of Trieste (Italy) and a MSc in Economics and Public Finance from the University of Padua (Italy). Previous to joining the CHE, he was research fellow in Health Economics at the International Renal Research Institute of Vicenza, and he worked as an intern in a pharmaceutical consulting company in Turin.




Dr Gerry Richardson
gerry.richardson@york.ac.uk

Gerry is a Senior Research Fellow in the Team for Economic Evaluation and Health Technology Assessment in the Centre for Health Economics (York). He has a first degree in Economics from the University of Hull and he has a MSc in health economics (1992) from the University of York. Gerry completed his PhD, also from the University of York, in 2007.

His PhD was funded by an award from the Department of Health's R&D Programme and involved an applied and methodological programme of work around the cost-effectiveness of self management interventions.  Gerry’s research interests include the cost-effectiveness of self-management interventions and establishing the transferability of results of these cost-effectiveness analyses, as well as assessing patients’ trade-offs between health and non-health outcomes.

Gerry has worked in economic evaluation for 20 years and is currently a sub panel member NIHR Programme Grants for Applied Research and the North East Research for Patient Benefit scheme.




Professor Mark Sculpher
Theme Lead for HEOM

Mark Sculpher is Professor of Health Economics at the Centre for Health Economics, University of York, UK where he is Director of the Programme on Economic Evaluation and Health Technology Assessment. He is also Deputy Director of the Policy Research Unit in Economic Evaluation of Health and Care Interventions, a 5-year programme, run collaboratively with the University of Sheffield and funded by the UK Department of Health.

Mark has worked in the field of economic evaluation and health technology assessment for over 25 years.  He has researched in a range of clinical areas including heart disease, cancer, diagnostics and public health. He has also contributed to methods in the field, in particular relating to decision analytic modelling and techniques to handle uncertainty, heterogeneity and generalisability. 

Elizabeth Taylor Buck

Elizabeth has worked in child and adolescent mental health settings for 20 years, initially for the NSPCC and then in NHS Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS).She has training in art psychotherapy, mentalisation-based therapy with families (MBT-F) and Interpersonal therapy with adolescents (IPT-A). Elizabeth's particular interest and expertise lies in in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) research.

She is currently working with the Economics Evaluation in Health and Care Interventions Policy Research Unit (EEPRU) on a research project to develop a recovery and mental health specific quality of life measure for adults (ReQoL). Her research is focused on the face validity of ReQoL with young adults aged 16-18 and with clinicians.

 

Dr Tracey Young
Acting Theme Lead for HEOM 
t.a.young@sheffield.ac.uk

Tracey is a senior health economist in the School for Health and Related Research (ScHARR) at the University of Sheffield and has almost 20 years’ experience in health service research. Tracey’s research interests include measuring uncertainty in economic evaluations, the development of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs), and economic evaluations alongside both trial and non-trial based studies.

Tracey has been involved in a number of economic evaluations in emergency medicine, looking at the long-term impact of severe trauma and the cost-effectiveness of regional trauma networks. She has also developed methodology for the selection of items from health related quality of life questionnaires that can then be used to develop preference-based PROMs using Rasch analysis.