Smoking Cessation Interventio
n for Severe Mental Ill Health Trial: a definitive randomised evaluation of a bespoke cessation service (SCIMITAR+)

 

Lead: Professor Simon Gilbody

Trial Manager: Emily Peckham (emily.peckham@york.ac.uk)

Collaborators:  Elizabeth Hughes, Timothy Bradshaw, Sarah Knowles, Steve Parrott, Thomas Hughes, Thomas Ricketts, David Osborn, Suzy Ker, Joseph Reilly, Jinshuo Li, Catherine Hewitt

Background: 
Smoking is an important health issue among people with severe mental ill health who are three times more likely to smoke than the general population. Despite this, studies have found that people with severe mental illness are just as likely to want to give up or cut down smoking as the general population but people with severe mental ill health are less likely to access conventional stop smoking cessation services.


To address this, a bespoke smoking cessation intervention has been developed which has been tailored to the needs of people with severe mental ill health. A pilot trial has been conducted to explore the feasibility of delivering this intervention and to pilot recruitment and retention methods which demonstrated that it was possible to deliver this intervention and to recruit and retain participants in a pilot trial. A definitive trial testing the effectiveness of this bespoke smoking cessation intervention compared to usual care SCIMITAR+ will now be conducted.




Methods: 

The trial will be a two arm parallel group individually randomised controlled trial comparing the bespoke smoking cessation intervention with current usual care for smoking cessation and will aim to recruit 400 people with severe mental ill health. The trial will be recruiting from early September 2015 to the end of December 2016.



This project was funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment (NIHR HTA) Programme (project number 11/136/52) and will be published in full in Health Technology Assessment.

The views and opinions expressed therein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the HTA programme, NIHR, NHS or the Department of Health.